Study Finds Regular Fish Oil Use Lowered Breast Cancer Risk

July 8th, 2010

Omega-3 fatty acids such as those found in fish oil supplements may reduce the risk of breast cancer, according to a new study.

Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center in Seattle followed 35,016 post-menopausal women who had no history of breast cancer.

They asked the women to fill out a questionnaire about their use of non-vitamin, non-mineral specialty supplements, and then followed their progress for an average of six years.

They found that women who regularly used fish oil supplements had a 32 percent reduced risk of developing the most common form of breast cancer. Of the total number of women in the study, 880 developed the disease.

Take Charge of Your Hospital Stay to Avoid Medical Mistakes

June 5th, 2010

Studies show that 98,000 people die in hospitals every year because of medical errors.

That’s a staggering statistic, but there’s ways to make sure those medical mistakes don’t happen to you.

Dr. Marie Savard, “Good Morning America” medical contributor, has 5 insider tips that could save your life on your next hospital stay.

Savard’s Tips

Have a copy of your medical records when you visit the hospital. Savard says she has a three-ring binder of medical information for herself and her parents.

The New Pill: Drug Promises to Boost Female Sex Drive

May 25th, 2010

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration may approve a pill next month that could boost women’s sex drives.

Flibanserin, the drug made by German pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim, is already being called the “female Viagra” because its potential effects could change women’s sex lives much as Viagra did by treating men’s erectile dysfunction.

But even though flibanserin is being likened to Viagra, the two drugs work in very different ways, according to Dr. Marie Savard, “Good Morning America” medical contributor.

On the show this morning, Savard said flibanserin works on a woman’s brain chemistry, increasing her desire for sex, while Viagra increases blood flow to the genitals, increasing a man’s ability to perform.

Study: Dietary Added Sugars Pose Heart Attack, Stroke and Diabetes Risk

April 22nd, 2010

The average American consumes about 156 pounds of added sugar each year per capita, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Take Charge of Your Hospital Stay to Avoid Medical Mistakes

March 22nd, 2010

Studies show that 98,000 people die in hospitals every year because of medical errors.

That’s a staggering statistic, but there’s ways to make sure those medical mistakes don’t happen to you.

Dr. Marie Savard, “Good Morning America” medical contributor, visited the show this morning to share six insider tips that could save your life on your next hospital stay.

Savard’s Tips

Try not to schedule your hospital stay in June, July or August. Those are the months when new residents start working and older ones move up the ladder, Savard said. She also said to avoid surgery on Thursday or Friday, especially Friday.

Causes and Treatments for Common Allergies

March 18th, 2010

Spring means warmer days and blooming flowers. Many will delight in the change of season, but for millions of seasonal allergy sufferers across the United States, spring spells trouble.

Congestion. Itchy eyes. Scratchy throat. Hives.

According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, allergic rhinitis — better known as hay fever — affects an estimated 60 million people in the United States.

Over-the-counter and prescription drugs to treat allergies cost Americans more than $11.5 billion, according to the organization’s figures from 2005.

This morning, Dr. Marie Savard appeared on “Good Morning America” to talk about common allergies and how to treat them.

Questions Doctors Wish Patients Would Ask

February 25th, 2010

You’ve finally wrestled your way onto your doctor’s calendar for six full minutes of his or her undivided attention — now what? Since so many of us sashay out of our physician’s office without answers to our most nagging concerns, AOL Health suggests that you show up with an actual list — starting with a few important questions that patients often forget to pose. The straight-talking Marie Savard, M.D., author of “Ask Dr. Marie,” gave us the list of seven questions that she most wishes her patients would ask her.

NATIONALLY RENOWNED HEALTH EXPERT JOINS NEWCOURTLAND NETWORK AS MEDICAL DIRECTOR

February 2nd, 2010

PHILADELPHIA,Feb. 2/PRNewswire-USNewswire/ –NewCourtland, a leading long-term care provider of community services, affordable senior housing, nursing homes, education and workforce development, announced that health expert Dr. Marie Savard, has joined its Network as corporate medical director.

As corporate medical director, Dr. Savard will serve as the chief medical advisor to NewCourtland’s Board of Trustees and will represent the physician’s perspective on the senior management team.   Dr. Savard will coordinate and oversee all medical care and clinical standards in use throughout NewCourtland’s Network, which today encompasses seven nursing homes, a growing number of home and community-based services including its home health agency, telehealth company, a LIFE program which is modeled after the nationally renowned PACE program, and an adult day center slated to open in the spring of 2010.

THOSE PERKY SALLY FIELD’S ADDS TELLING US “SOMETHING WE MAY NOT KNOW”

January 7th, 2010

With a new year upon us, I am hoping we get a rest from Sally Field’s perky voice on television. You know, the voice that reminds us there is “something about osteoporosis that you might not know” while selling us on her favorite osteoporosis treatment. You know those ads; they appear almost nightly on our TV screens and in magazines. As a postmenopausal woman at risk for osteoporosis and a practitioner who has cared for elderly women for almost thirty years, I DO care a lot about this disease. But I don’t care for the commercials. 

So why am I so annoyed?

WOMEN KNOW BEST WHEN THEY REJECT MEDICATION TO PREVENT BREAST CANCER

December 17th, 2009

A recent article by one of my favorite health writers for the New York Times, Tara Parker-Pope, questioned the decision of millions of women not to take the drug tamoxifen to lower their odds of developing breast cancer. I was stunned by her conclusions. I always thought these women were making a wise and reasonable choice based on the evidence and I strongly disagreed with her conclusions.